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How Big Telecom Smothers Municipal Broadband

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 7:35am
Rick Zeman writes: The Center for Public Integrity has a comprehensive article showing how Big Telecom (aka, AT&T, Comcast, Charter, Time Warner) use lobbyists, paid-for politicians, and lawsuits (both actual and the threat thereof) in their efforts to kill municipal broadband. From the article: "The companies have also used traditional campaign tactics such as newspaper ads, push polls, direct mail and door-to-door canvassing to block municipal networks. And they've tried to undermine the appetite for municipal broadband by paying for research from think tanks and front groups to portray the networks as unreliable and costly."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Australian Consumer Watch Dog Group Sues Valve Over Steam Refund Policy

Game Politics - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 7:22am

GamesBeat reports that the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has taken Valve Software to court over its "no refunds" policy on Steam.

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Earth's tectonic plates have doubled their speed

New Scientist - Breaking news - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 7:00am
The latest study suggests Earth's plates today move twice as fast as they did 2 billion years ago – maybe because the mantle has got more runny






Categories: Science & Tech News

Magnetic Stimulation Boosts Memory In Humans

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:52am
sciencehabit writes: Our memories are annoyingly glitchy. Names, dates, birthdays, and the locations of car keys fall through the cracks, losses that accelerate at an alarming pace with age and in neurodegenerative diseases. Now, by applying electromagnetic pulses through the skull to carefully targeted brain regions, researchers have found a way to boost memory performance in healthy people. The new study (abstract) sheds light on the neural networks that support memories and may lead to therapies for people with memory deficits, researchers say. Similar studies have been performed using electric current.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

Puppy Games Launches Patreon for MMO 'Battledroid'

Game Politics - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:39am

Puppy Games has launched a Patreon to fund the ongoing development of its free MMO Battledroid. While the small indie studio continues to work on it, it has come to the conclusion that the MMO needs at least another year of development time and it does not have enough money to fund that effort. So they decided to turn to Patreon instead of other crowdfunding methods like Indiegogo or Kickstarter to raise some funds.

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Voyager 2's view of solar system's edge will be unique

New Scientist - Breaking news - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:21am
There's reason to think Voyager 2's sensors will pick up changes that contrast with what Voyager 1 saw en route to the edge of interstellar space






Categories: Science & Tech News

Konami veteran Dave Cox leaves company after 17 years

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:20am

Dave Cox, a Konami veteran of 17 years, has decided to leave the company to "explore new opportunities." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Coffee Naps Better For Alertness Than Coffee Or Naps Alone

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:10am
An anonymous reader writes: Caffeine is a staple of most workplaces — it's rare to find an office without a coffee pot or a fridge full of soda. It's necessary (or at least feels like it's necessary) because many workers have a hard time staying awake while sitting at a desk for hours at a time, and the alternative — naps — aren't usually allowed. But new research shows it might be more efficient for employers to encourage brief "coffee naps," which are more effective at returning people to an alert state than either caffeine or naps alone. A "coffee nap" is when you drink a cup of coffee, and then take a sub-20-minute nap immediately afterward. This works because caffeine takes about 20 minutes to get into your bloodstream, and a 20-minute nap clears adenosine from your brain without putting you into deeper stages of sleep. In multiple studies, tired participants who took coffee naps made fewer mistakes in a driving simulator after they awoke than the people who drank coffee without a nap or slept without ingesting caffeine.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Coffee Naps Better For Alertness Than Coffee Or Naps Alone

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:10am
An anonymous reader writes: Caffeine is a staple of most workplaces — it's rare to find an office without a coffee pot or a fridge full of soda. It's necessary (or at least feels like it's necessary) because many workers have a hard time staying awake while sitting at a desk for hours at a time, and the alternative — naps — aren't usually allowed. But new research shows it might be more efficient for employers to encourage brief "coffee naps," which are more effective at returning people to an alert state than either caffeine or naps alone. A "coffee nap" is when you drink a cup of coffee, and then take a sub-20-minute nap immediately afterward. This works because caffeine takes about 20 minutes to get into your bloodstream, and a 20-minute nap clears adenosine from your brain without putting you into deeper stages of sleep. In multiple studies, tired participants who took coffee naps made fewer mistakes in a driving simulator after they awoke than the people who drank coffee without a nap or slept without ingesting caffeine.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Coffee Naps Better For Alertness Than Coffee Or Naps Alone

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:10am
An anonymous reader writes: Caffeine is a staple of most workplaces — it's rare to find an office without a coffee pot or a fridge full of soda. It's necessary (or at least feels like it's necessary) because many workers have a hard time staying awake while sitting at a desk for hours at a time, and the alternative — naps — aren't usually allowed. But new research shows it might be more efficient for employers to encourage brief "coffee naps," which are more effective at returning people to an alert state than either caffeine or naps alone. A "coffee nap" is when you drink a cup of coffee, and then take a sub-20-minute nap immediately afterward. This works because caffeine takes about 20 minutes to get into your bloodstream, and a 20-minute nap clears adenosine from your brain without putting you into deeper stages of sleep. In multiple studies, tired participants who took coffee naps made fewer mistakes in a driving simulator after they awoke than the people who drank coffee without a nap or slept without ingesting caffeine.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Coffee Naps Better For Alertness Than Coffee Or Naps Alone

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:10am
An anonymous reader writes: Caffeine is a staple of most workplaces — it's rare to find an office without a coffee pot or a fridge full of soda. It's necessary (or at least feels like it's necessary) because many workers have a hard time staying awake while sitting at a desk for hours at a time, and the alternative — naps — aren't usually allowed. But new research shows it might be more efficient for employers to encourage brief "coffee naps," which are more effective at returning people to an alert state than either caffeine or naps alone. A "coffee nap" is when you drink a cup of coffee, and then take a sub-20-minute nap immediately afterward. This works because caffeine takes about 20 minutes to get into your bloodstream, and a 20-minute nap clears adenosine from your brain without putting you into deeper stages of sleep. In multiple studies, tired participants who took coffee naps made fewer mistakes in a driving simulator after they awoke than the people who drank coffee without a nap or slept without ingesting caffeine.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Coffee Naps Better For Alertness Than Coffee Or Naps Alone

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:10am
An anonymous reader writes: Caffeine is a staple of most workplaces — it's rare to find an office without a coffee pot or a fridge full of soda. It's necessary (or at least feels like it's necessary) because many workers have a hard time staying awake while sitting at a desk for hours at a time, and the alternative — naps — aren't usually allowed. But new research shows it might be more efficient for employers to encourage brief "coffee naps," which are more effective at returning people to an alert state than either caffeine or naps alone. A "coffee nap" is when you drink a cup of coffee, and then take a sub-20-minute nap immediately afterward. This works because caffeine takes about 20 minutes to get into your bloodstream, and a 20-minute nap clears adenosine from your brain without putting you into deeper stages of sleep. In multiple studies, tired participants who took coffee naps made fewer mistakes in a driving simulator after they awoke than the people who drank coffee without a nap or slept without ingesting caffeine.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Nintendo announces New 3DS with C-stick, extra buttons and NFC

GamesIndustry.biz news - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 5:45am
But upped CPU means some new games won't work on old devices
Categories: Gaming News

How I teach game design: Games and rules

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 5:44am

NYU's Eric Zimmerman: A rules-centric approach is a very dry and restrictive way of looking at game design. It's a formal approach to game design (more on that below). But it's often incredibly useful." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Principle Player in Leland Yee Arms Trading Case Dies

Game Politics - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 5:36am

According to a report in the San Francisco Examiner, the dentists who allegedly facilitated an arms trading deal between rebels in the southern part of the Philippines and a party in the United States represented by now-suspended California state senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco - pictured) has died.

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Emailing angry? Your keyboard feels your pain

New Scientist - Breaking news - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 5:30am
By measuring the way you are typing, a computer program can detect how you are feeling with 80 per cent accuracy






Categories: Science & Tech News

US Government Fights To Not Explain No-Fly List Selection Process

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 5:29am
An anonymous reader writes: On August 6, U.S. District Judge Anthony Trenga ordered the federal government to "explain why the government places U.S. citizens who haven't been convicted of any violent crimes on its no-fly database." Unsurprisingly, the federal government objected to the order, once more claiming that to divulge their no-fly list criteria would expose state secrets and thus pose a national security threat. When the judge said he would read the material privately, the government insisted that reading the material "would not assist the Court in deciding the pending Motion to Dismiss (PDF) because it is not an appropriate means to test the scope of the assertion of the State Secrets privilege." The federal government has until September 7 to comply with the judge's order unless the judge is swayed by the government's objection.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

US Government Fights To Not Explain No-Fly List Selection Process

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 5:29am
An anonymous reader writes: On August 6, U.S. District Judge Anthony Trenga ordered the federal government to "explain why the government places U.S. citizens who haven't been convicted of any violent crimes on its no-fly database." Unsurprisingly, the federal government objected to the order, once more claiming that to divulge their no-fly list criteria would expose state secrets and thus pose a national security threat. When the judge said he would read the material privately, the government insisted that reading the material "would not assist the Court in deciding the pending Motion to Dismiss (PDF) because it is not an appropriate means to test the scope of the assertion of the State Secrets privilege." The federal government has until September 7 to comply with the judge's order unless the judge is swayed by the government's objection.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

US Government Fights To Not Explain No-Fly List Selection Process

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 5:29am
An anonymous reader writes: On August 6, U.S. District Judge Anthony Trenga ordered the federal government to "explain why the government places U.S. citizens who haven't been convicted of any violent crimes on its no-fly database." Unsurprisingly, the federal government objected to the order, once more claiming that to divulge their no-fly list criteria would expose state secrets and thus pose a national security threat. When the judge said he would read the material privately, the government insisted that reading the material "would not assist the Court in deciding the pending Motion to Dismiss (PDF) because it is not an appropriate means to test the scope of the assertion of the State Secrets privilege." The federal government has until September 7 to comply with the judge's order unless the judge is swayed by the government's objection.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

US Government Fights To Not Explain No-Fly List Selection Process

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 5:29am
An anonymous reader writes: On August 6, U.S. District Judge Anthony Trenga ordered the federal government to "explain why the government places U.S. citizens who haven't been convicted of any violent crimes on its no-fly database." Unsurprisingly, the federal government objected to the order, once more claiming that to divulge their no-fly list criteria would expose state secrets and thus pose a national security threat. When the judge said he would read the material privately, the government insisted that reading the material "would not assist the Court in deciding the pending Motion to Dismiss (PDF) because it is not an appropriate means to test the scope of the assertion of the State Secrets privilege." The federal government has until September 7 to comply with the judge's order unless the judge is swayed by the government's objection.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News
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