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Don't Miss: How would the Affordable Care Act repeal impact indie devs?

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 9:01am

"After all the talk about small business and creating jobs, anything that makes it scarier to strike out on your own and start a new business is a loss to our entire economy." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Maths explains how pedestrians avoid bumping into one another

New Scientist - Breaking news - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 8:55am
A model that takes into account sudden U-turns and other random behaviour by individuals in a crowd could be used to help prevent stampedes  
Categories: Science & Tech News

We're streaming some Mass Effect: Andromeda multiplayer today at 3PM EDT

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 8:47am

Join us at 3PM EDT (12 PDT) for a close look at the best ways to die in the new Mass Effect: Andromeda multiplayer. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Enigmatic plumes from Saturn’s moon caused by cosmic collision

New Scientist - Breaking news - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 8:43am
Saturn’s icy moon spews water and heat into space, but only from its south pole. A new model suggests that’s because it suffered a hit-and-run long ago
Categories: Science & Tech News

App That Lets People Make Personalized Emojis Is the Fastest Growing App In Past Two Years

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 8:40am
From a report on Axios: Bitmoji is the fastest-growing app in America, per comScore, with a more than 5000 percent increase in monthly unique visitors over the past two years. E-commerce apps OfferUp and Letgo are the 2nd and 3rd fastest-growing apps. The findings from comScore's latest study highlight three of the fastest-growing mobile market trends: E-commerce: Letgo (3), OfferUp (2), Flipp (4), Venmo (5) and Wish (7), are facilitating real-world marketplace transactions. Travel: Uber (6), Waze (8) and Lyft (9) all help users travel from one point to another via auto. Social connectivity: Tinder (10), Bitmoji (1) and GroupMe (11) all facilitate gatherings and social interaction. FastCompany wrote a profile of Bitmoji and why so many people seem to be a big fan of it.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Blog: Deconstructing the music behind the dungeons in Link's Awakening

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 8:05am

The dungeon music in Link's Awakening is the subject of this deconstructing article, where we'll take a look in detail at a work of music and break it down into its disparate parts. ...

Categories: Gaming News

10,000 game projects have been funded through Kickstarter

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 8:00am

In something of a milestone moment, 10,000 games projects have now been successfully funded through Kickstarter. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Americans' Shift To The Suburbs Sped Up Last Year

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 8:00am
Jed Kolko, writing for FiveThirtyEight: The suburbanization of America marches on. Population growth in big cities slowed for the fifth-straight year in 2016, according to new census data, while population growth accelerated in the more sprawling counties that surround them. The Census Bureau on Thursday released population estimates for every one of the more than 3,000 counties in the U.S. I grouped those counties into six categories: urban centers of large metropolitan areas; their densely populated suburbs; their lightly populated suburbs; midsize metros; smaller metro areas; and rural counties, which are outside metro areas entirely. The fastest growth was in those lower-density suburbs. Those counties grew by 1.3 percent in 2016, the fastest rate since 2008, when the housing bust put an end to rapid homebuilding in these areas. In the South and West, growth in large-metro lower-density suburbs topped 2 percent in 2016, led by counties such as Kendall and Comal north of San Antonio; Hays near Austin; and Forsyth, north of Atlanta.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Old blood can be made young again and it might fight ageing

New Scientist - Breaking news - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 7:55am
A protein can boost blood stem cells, making them behave like those of younger people. Is it the key to harnessing young blood’s rejuvenating power?
Categories: Science & Tech News

Some Of Hacker Group's Claims Of Having Access To 250M iCloud Accounts Aren't False

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 7:20am
Earlier this week, a hacker group claimed that it had access to 250 million iCloud accounts. The hackers, who called themselves part of Turkish Crime Family group, threatened to reset passwords of all the iCloud accounts and remotely wipe those iPhones. Apple could stop them, they said, if it paid them a ransom by April 7. In a statement, Apple said, "the alleged list of email addresses and passwords appears to have been obtained from previously compromised third-party services," and that it is working with law enforcement officials to identify the hackers. Now, ZDNet reports that it obtained a set of credentials from the hacker group and was able to verify some of the claims. From the article: ZDNet obtained a set of 54 credentials from the hacker group for verification. All the 54 accounts were valid, based on a check using the site's password reset function. These accounts include "icloud.com," dating back to 2011, and legacy "me.com" and "mac.com" domains from as early as 2000. The list of credentials contained just email addresses and plain-text passwords, separated by a colon, which according to Troy Hunt, data breach expert and owner of notification site Have I Been Pwned, makes it likely that the data "could be aggregated from various sources." We started working to contact each person, one by one, to confirm their password. Most of the accounts are no longer registered with iMessage and could not be immediately reached. However, 10 people in total confirmed that their passwords were accurate, and as a result have now been changed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Some Of Hacker Group's Claim Of Having Access To 250M iCloud Account Aren't False

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 7:20am
Earlier this week, a hacker group claimed that it had access to 250 million iCloud accounts. The hackers, who called themselves part of Turkish Crime Family group, threatened to reset passwords of all the iCloud accounts and remotely wipe those iPhones. Apple could stop them, they said, if it paid them a ransom by April 7. In a statement, Apple said, "the alleged list of email addresses and passwords appears to have been obtained from previously compromised third-party services," and that it is working with law enforcement officials to identify the hackers. Now, ZDNet reports that it obtained a set of credentials from the hacker group and was able to verify some of the claims. From the article: ZDNet obtained a set of 54 credentials from the hacker group for verification. All the 54 accounts were valid, based on a check using the site's password reset function. These accounts include "icloud.com," dating back to 2011, and legacy "me.com" and "mac.com" domains from as early as 2000. The list of credentials contained just email addresses and plain-text passwords, separated by a colon, which according to Troy Hunt, data breach expert and owner of notification site Have I Been Pwned, makes it likely that the data "could be aggregated from various sources." We started working to contact each person, one by one, to confirm their password. Most of the accounts are no longer registered with iMessage and could not be immediately reached. However, 10 people in total confirmed that their passwords were accurate, and as a result have now been changed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Battle.net is no more as Blizzard rolls out rebrand

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 7:19am

World of Warcraft developer Blizzard has laid the "Battle.net" brand to rest after two decades of service.  ...

Categories: Gaming News

InXile founder Brian Fargo will retire once Wasteland 3 has shipped

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 6:55am

"I look at my friends, they have a lot more spare time than I do. It's a very intense business. It's all encompassing. It seems like I should relax for a little bit." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Blog: How we created our typing adventure game, Epistory

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 6:54am

A bit of a post-mortem, a bit of marketing article, a bit of art. Here's a retrospective on the development of our typing adventure game, Epistory. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Amazon Wins $1.5 Billion Tax Dispute Over IRS

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 6:40am
Amazon.com on Thursday won a more than $1.5 billion tax dispute with the Internal Revenue Service over transactions involving a Luxembourg unit more than a decade ago. From a report: Judge Albert Lauber of the U.S. Tax Court rejected a variety of IRS arguments, and found that on several occasions the agency abused its discretion, or acted arbitrarily or capriciously. Amazon's ultimate tax liability from the decision was not immediately clear. The world's largest online retailer has said the case involved transactions in 2005 and 2006, and could boost its federal tax bill by $1.5 billion plus interest. It also said a loss could add "significant" tax liabilities in later years. Amazon made just $2.37 billion of profit in 2016, four times what it made in the four prior years combined, on revenue of $136 billion.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Nintendo disappointed by Super Mario Run revenues

GamesIndustry.biz news - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 6:32am
However, company says it still prefers pay-once model to free-to-play formulas like the one used in Fire Emblem Heroes
Categories: Gaming News

Hollywood Producer Blames Rotten Tomatoes For Convincing People Not To See His Movie

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 6:00am
An anonymous reader shares a VanityFair report: These days, it takes less than 60 seconds to know what the general consensus on a new movie is -- thanks to Rotten Tomatoes, the review aggregator site that designates a number score to each film based on critical and user reviews. Although this may be convenient for moviegoers not necessarily interested in burning $15 on a critically subpar film, it is certainly not convenient for those Hollywood directors, producers, backers, and stars who toiled to make said critically subpar film. In fact, the site may be "the worst thing that we have in today's movie culture" -- at least according to Brett Ratner, the Rush Hour director/producer who recently threw the financial weight of his RatPac Entertainment behind Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Sure, the blockbuster made over $850 million worldwide in spite of negative reviews ... but just think of how much more it could have made had it not had a Rotten Tomatoes score of 27 percent! Last week, while speaking at the Sun Valley Film Festival, Ratner said, "The worst thing that we have in today's movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. I think it's the destruction of our business."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

How to brush up your CV for the GamesIndustry.biz Careers Fair

GamesIndustry.biz news - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 5:46am
Road to Rezzed: Developers, publishers and more offer advice on how to improve your chances of securing your next job
Categories: Gaming News

Fish that keep salmon clean and healthy risk being wiped out

New Scientist - Breaking news - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 5:27am
Wrasse help remove lice from salmon, enabling farmers to use fewer pesticides. But escalating demand for these fish could be disrupting important wild ecosystems
Categories: Science & Tech News

Blog: Living the dream - from video game player to successful creator

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 5:15am

In this two-part blog post, I tell the story of how I became a successful indie developer, discussing funding, crowdfunding, recruiting developers, and more. ...

Categories: Gaming News
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