news aggregator

DICE Awards get new categories

GamesIndustry.biz news - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 10:08am
AIAS opens nominations, with new nods for technical impact and risky indies
Categories: Gaming News

Blog: How to get diversity in game dev - without the internet arguments

Gamasutra - News - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 10:07am

One indie dev's action plan for making a change: "I say we follow up our positive ideologies with positive actions. Things that will bring real diversity into the industry." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Prince of Persia creator donates dev archive to Museum of Play

Gamasutra - News - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 10:02am

Prince of Persia creator Jordan Mechner has donated a wealth of materials documenting the game's development to The Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester, New York. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Brain decoder can eavesdrop on your inner voice

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 10:00am
As you read this, your neurons are firing – that brain activity can now be decoded to reveal the silent words in your head






Categories: Science & Tech News

Apple Pay Competitor CurrentC Breached

Slashdot Updates - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:51am
tranquilidad writes "As previously discussed on Slashdot, CurrentC is a consortium of merchants attempting to create a "more secure" payment system. Some controversy surrounds CurrentC's requirements regarding the personal information required, their purchase-tracking intentions and retail stores blocking NFC in apparent support of CurrentC. Now news breaks that CurrentC has already been breached. CurrentC has issued the standard response, "We take the security of our users' information extremely seriously."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Call of Duty Endowment launches Race To 1,000 Jobs

GamesIndustry.biz news - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:31am
Twitch and retailers supporting non-profit for veterans
Categories: Gaming News

Today on New Scientist

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:30am
All the latest on newscientist.com: the great sea otter comeback, cold moon with a warm heart, milk and broken bones, tribal lessons, overpopulation and more






Categories: Science & Tech News

Seabed feeding frenzy proves dead jellyfish get eaten

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:30am
Time-lapse imagery of scavengers tucking in proves that dead jellyfish aren't unpalatable after all, so can return nutrients to the sea's food webs






Categories: Science & Tech News

National STEM Video Game Challenge Open For Submissions

Game Politics - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:28am

Student submissions for original video games and game designs to the National STEM Video Game Challenge are open today. The national contest is presented by E-Line Media, the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop and the Smithsonian. The Challenge aims to motivate young people to be more interested in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) learning by using the power of playing and making video games.

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Computer with human-like learning will program itself

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:09am
The Neural Turing Machine will combine the best of number-crunching with the human-like adaptability of neural networks – so it can invent its own programs






Categories: Science & Tech News

Researchers At Brown University Shattered a Quantum Wave Function

Slashdot Updates - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:08am
Jason Koebler writes: A team of physicists based at Brown University has succeeded in shattering a quantum wave function. That near-mythical representation of indeterminate reality, in which an unmeasured particle is able to occupy many states simultaneously, can be dissected into many parts. This dissection, which is described this week in the Journal of Low Temperature Physics, has the potential to turn how we view the quantum world on its head. Specifically, they found it's possible to take a wave function and isolate it into different parts. So, if our electron has some probability of being in position (x1,y1,z1) and another probability of being in position (x2,y2,z2), those two probabilities can be isolated from each other, cordoned off like quantum crime scenes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Researchers At Brown University Shattered a Quantum Wave Function

Slashdot Updates - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:08am
Jason Koebler writes: A team of physicists based at Brown University has succeeded in shattering a quantum wave function. That near-mythical representation of indeterminate reality, in which an unmeasured particle is able to occupy many states simultaneously, can be dissected into many parts. This dissection, which is described this week in the Journal of Low Temperature Physics, has the potential to turn how we view the quantum world on its head. Specifically, they found it's possible to take a wave function and isolate it into different parts. So, if our electron has some probability of being in position (x1,y1,z1) and another probability of being in position (x2,y2,z2), those two probabilities can be isolated from each other, cordoned off like quantum crime scenes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Researchers At Brown University Shattered a Quantum Wave Function

Slashdot Updates - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:08am
Jason Koebler writes: A team of physicists based at Brown University has succeeded in shattering a quantum wave function. That near-mythical representation of indeterminate reality, in which an unmeasured particle is able to occupy many states simultaneously, can be dissected into many parts. This dissection, which is described this week in the Journal of Low Temperature Physics, has the potential to turn how we view the quantum world on its head. Specifically, they found it's possible to take a wave function and isolate it into different parts. So, if our electron has some probability of being in position (x1,y1,z1) and another probability of being in position (x2,y2,z2), those two probabilities can be isolated from each other, cordoned off like quantum crime scenes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Cargo rocket explosion is a blow for commercial space

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:05am
No one was hurt when the uncrewed Orbital Sciences spacecraft blew up seconds after take-off – but has the reputation of private shuttles been injured?






Categories: Science & Tech News

Cellular alchemy turns skin cells into brain cells

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 9:00am
To turn one cell into another you usually need to first rewind them into embryonic-like stem cells. But there is another, potentially safer, way






Categories: Science & Tech News

How can public Steam data inform game devs? Find out at GDC 2015

Gamasutra - News - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 8:59am

Ars Technica senior gaming editor Kyle Orland is coming to GDC 2015 in March to share useful takeaways from his research data-mining thousands of public Steam profiles. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate still Japanese #1

GamesIndustry.biz news - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 8:44am
Bethesda horror The Evil Within enters at 3 and 4
Categories: Gaming News

Why Every Cardiac Patient Needs a Virtual Heart

Slashdot Updates - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 8:25am
the_newsbeagle writes: In the latest high-tech approach to personalized medicine, cardiologists can now create a computer model of an individual patient's heart and use that simulation to make a treatment plan. In this new field of computational medicine, doctors use a patient's MRI scans to make a model showing that patient's unique anatomy and pattern of heart disease. They can then experiment on that virtual organ in ways they simply can't with a flesh-and-blood heart. Proponents say this tech can "improve therapies, minimize the invasiveness of diagnostic procedures, and reduce health-care costs" in cardiology.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

How to make game trailers like the triple-A studios

Gamasutra - News - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 8:23am

A how-to guide that breaks down a trailer: "Take time and create a trailer you're proud of. Show friends and your team before publishing. It's entirely about quality when showcasing your game." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Trap cells in sound to create strong cartilage

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 8:23am
Ultrasound waves can be used to trap cartilage cells and bind them into sheets that can be easily grafted on to damaged tissue






Categories: Science & Tech News
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