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Sale of IBM's Chip-Making Business To GlobalFoundries To Get US Security Review

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 5:25am
dcblogs writes IBM is an officially sanctioned trusted supplier to the U.S. Defense Dept., and the transfer of its semiconductor manufacturing to GlobalFoundries, a U.S.-based firm owned by investors in Abu Dhabi, will get U.S. scrutiny. Retired U.S. Army Brig. Gen. John Adams, who authored a report last year for an industry group about U.S. supply chain vulnerabilities and national security, said regulators will have to look closely. "I don't want cast aspersions unnecessarily on Abu Dubai — but they're not Canada," said Adams "I think that the news that we may be selling part of our supply chain for semiconductors to a foreign investor is actually bad news."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Sale of IBM's Chip-Making Business To GlobalFoundries To Get US Security Review

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 5:25am
dcblogs writes IBM is an officially sanctioned trusted supplier to the U.S. Defense Dept., and the transfer of its semiconductor manufacturing to GlobalFoundries, a U.S.-based firm owned by investors in Abu Dhabi, will get U.S. scrutiny. Retired U.S. Army Brig. Gen. John Adams, who authored a report last year for an industry group about U.S. supply chain vulnerabilities and national security, said regulators will have to look closely. "I don't want cast aspersions unnecessarily on Abu Dubai — but they're not Canada," said Adams "I think that the news that we may be selling part of our supply chain for semiconductors to a foreign investor is actually bad news."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Sale of IBM's Chip-Making Business To GlobalFoundries To Get US Security Review

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 5:25am
dcblogs writes IBM is an officially sanctioned trusted supplier to the U.S. Defense Dept., and the transfer of its semiconductor manufacturing to GlobalFoundries, a U.S.-based firm owned by investors in Abu Dhabi, will get U.S. scrutiny. Retired U.S. Army Brig. Gen. John Adams, who authored a report last year for an industry group about U.S. supply chain vulnerabilities and national security, said regulators will have to look closely. "I don't want cast aspersions unnecessarily on Abu Dubai — but they're not Canada," said Adams "I think that the news that we may be selling part of our supply chain for semiconductors to a foreign investor is actually bad news."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

The power of audience development for indies

Gamasutra - News - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 5:20am

"The earlier you start your marketing planning, the better off you'll be. This blog post focuses on the benefits of community and audience development programs." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Proposed Penalty For UK Hackers Who "Damage National Security": Life

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 4:44am
An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from The Guardian: Government plans that mean computer users deemed to have damaged national security, the economy or the environment will face a life sentence have been criticised by experts who warn that the new law could be used to target legitimate whistleblowers. The proposed legislation would mean that any British person deemed to have carried out an unauthorised act on a computer that resulted in damage to human welfare, the environment, the economy or national security in any country would face a possible life sentence. Last week the Joint Committee on Human Rights raised concerns about the proposals and the scope of such legislation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Proposed Penalty For UK Hackers Who "Damage National Security": Life

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 4:44am
An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from The Guardian: Government plans that mean computer users deemed to have damaged national security, the economy or the environment will face a life sentence have been criticised by experts who warn that the new law could be used to target legitimate whistleblowers. The proposed legislation would mean that any British person deemed to have carried out an unauthorised act on a computer that resulted in damage to human welfare, the environment, the economy or national security in any country would face a possible life sentence. Last week the Joint Committee on Human Rights raised concerns about the proposals and the scope of such legislation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Proposed Penalty For UK Hackers Who "Damage National Security": Life

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 4:44am
An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from The Guardian: Government plans that mean computer users deemed to have damaged national security, the economy or the environment will face a life sentence have been criticised by experts who warn that the new law could be used to target legitimate whistleblowers. The proposed legislation would mean that any British person deemed to have carried out an unauthorised act on a computer that resulted in damage to human welfare, the environment, the economy or national security in any country would face a possible life sentence. Last week the Joint Committee on Human Rights raised concerns about the proposals and the scope of such legislation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Proposed Penalty For UK Hackers Who "Damage National Security": Life

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 4:44am
An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from The Guardian: Government plans that mean computer users deemed to have damaged national security, the economy or the environment will face a life sentence have been criticised by experts who warn that the new law could be used to target legitimate whistleblowers. The proposed legislation would mean that any British person deemed to have carried out an unauthorised act on a computer that resulted in damage to human welfare, the environment, the economy or national security in any country would face a possible life sentence. Last week the Joint Committee on Human Rights raised concerns about the proposals and the scope of such legislation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

The Inevitable Death of the Internet Troll

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 4:03am
HughPickens.com writes James Swearingen writes at The Atlantic that the Internet can be a mean, hateful, and frightening place — especially for young women but human behavior and the limits placed on it by both law and society can change. In a Pew Research Center survey of 2,849 Internet users, one out of every four women between 18 years old and 24 years old reports having been stalked or sexually harassed online. "Like banner ads and spam bots, online harassment is still routinely treated as part of the landscape of being online," writes Swearingen adding that "we are in the early days of online harassment being taken as a serious problem, and not simply a quirk of online life." Law professor Danielle Citron draws a parallel between how sexual harassment was treated in the workplace decades ago and our current standard. "Think about in the 1960s and 1970s, what we said to women in the workplace," says Citron. "'This is just flirting.' That a sexually hostile environment was just a perk for men to enjoy, it's just what the environment is like. If you don't like it, leave and get a new job." It took years of activism, court cases, and Title VII protection to change that. "Here we are today, and sexual harassment in the workplace is not normal," said Citron. "Our norms and how we understand it are different now." According to Swearingen, the likely solution to internet trolls will be a combination of things. The expansion of laws like the one currently on the books in California, which expands what constitutes online harassment, could help put the pressure on harassers. The upcoming Supreme Court case, Elonis v. The United States, looks to test the limits of free speech versus threatening comments on Facebook. "Can a combination of legal action, market pressure, and societal taboo work together to curb harassment?" asks Swearingen. "Too many people do too much online for things to stay the way they are."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Blog: Lessons learned while pitching my game company to investors

Gamasutra - News - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 3:33am

"Hopefully what I've written here will prove helpful to those of you looking to get through your first pitch. It's worth the effort!" ...

Categories: Gaming News

Personal helicopter will be as easy to drive as a car

New Scientist - Breaking news - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 3:30am
Within two years, an 18-rotor battery-powered helicopter will be on sale to rich commuters who dream of open skies instead of gridlocked highways






Categories: Science & Tech News

No More 'Xbox Music' For Free

Game Politics - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 2:30am

The free streaming music that you enjoyed from Microsoft for free on Windows 8 PCs and on the web will soon cost you some money - every month. Microsoft revealed that its Xbox Music streaming service will now require a monthly subscription in order to keep using it in the future. The service, which launched for Windows 8 and via the web was launched in October of 2012 and was free (and ad supported).

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Blog: Batch processing for indies

Gamasutra - News - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 2:29am

"Batch processing means doing a lot of similar things all at once. People don't bake one cookie at a time, instead they make all the batter at once and get a lot of cookies created." ...

Categories: Gaming News

'Shroud of the Avatar' Coming to Steam Early Access in Late November

Game Politics - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 2:24am

Richard Garriott (best known as the creator of the popular Ultima series and the MMO Ultima Online) and his studio Portalarium are taking the next step to get his online RPG Shroud of the Avatar to Steam Early Access.

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Double Fine and IAm8Bit Team Up for 'Day of the Devs'

Game Politics - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 2:20am

On Saturday, November 1 from 1-4 pm, I Am 8Bit and Double Fine Productions will team up once again to present 'Day of the Devs,' a special event that showcases the best games from a variety of indie game studios.

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Apple Triumphs Over GPNE Corp. in $94 Million Patent Infringement Lawsuit

Game Politics - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 2:15am

A San Jose, California jury ruled that Apple's products do not infringe two patents owned by GPNE Corp., a patent-holding company that has licensed its patents to more than 20 other large firms. According Ars Technica, the jury ruled that two patents, numbered 7,570,954 and 7,792,492, were valid but Apple didn't violate them.

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Pew Poll: People Believe Online Gaming is the 'Least Welcoming Space' for Women

Game Politics - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 2:11am

According to a report on NPR's All Tech Considered, people believe gaming is the most unwelcoming space for women. That conclusion comes from a new Pew Research poll about the broader subject of online harassment and is based on responses from 2,849 web users (with a margin of error of plus or minus 2.4 percentage points).

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Machine Learning Expert Michael Jordan On the Delusions of Big Data

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 1:34am
First time accepted submitter agent elevator writes In a wide-ranging interview at IEEE Spectrum, Michael I. Jordan skewers a bunch of sacred cows, basically saying that: The overeager adoption of big data is likely to result in catastrophes of analysis comparable to a national epidemic of collapsing bridges. Hardware designers creating chips based on the human brain are engaged in a faith-based undertaking likely to prove a fool's errand; and despite recent claims to the contrary, we are no further along with computer vision than we were with physics when Isaac Newton sat under his apple tree.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Machine Learning Expert Michael Jordan On the Delusions of Big Data

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 1:34am
First time accepted submitter agent elevator writes In a wide-ranging interview at IEEE Spectrum, Michael I. Jordan skewers a bunch of sacred cows, basically saying that: The overeager adoption of big data is likely to result in catastrophes of analysis comparable to a national epidemic of collapsing bridges. Hardware designers creating chips based on the human brain are engaged in a faith-based undertaking likely to prove a fool's errand; and despite recent claims to the contrary, we are no further along with computer vision than we were with physics when Isaac Newton sat under his apple tree.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Machine Learning Expert Michael Jordan On the Delusions of Big Data

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 1:34am
First time accepted submitter agent elevator writes In a wide-ranging interview at IEEE Spectrum, Michael I. Jordan skewers a bunch of sacred cows, basically saying that: The overeager adoption of big data is likely to result in catastrophes of analysis comparable to a national epidemic of collapsing bridges. Hardware designers creating chips based on the human brain are engaged in a faith-based undertaking likely to prove a fool's errand; and despite recent claims to the contrary, we are no further along with computer vision than we were with physics when Isaac Newton sat under his apple tree.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News
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