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Supreme Court Gives FBI More Hacking Power

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 6:00am
An anonymous reader cites an article on The Intercept (edited and condensed): The Supreme Court on Thursday approved changes that would make it easier for the FBI to hack into computers, many of them belonging to victims of cybercrime. The changes, which will take immediate effect in December unless Congress adopts competing legislation, would allow the FBI go hunting for anyone browsing the Internet anonymously in the U.S. with a single warrant. Previously, under the federal rules on criminal procedures, a magistrate judge couldn't approve a warrant request to search a computer remotely if the investigator didn't know where the computer was -- because it might be outside his or her jurisdiction. The rule change would allow a magistrate judge to issue a warrant to search or seize an electronic device if the target is using anonymity software like Tor."Unbelievable," said Edward Snowden. "FBI sneaks radical expansion of power through courts, avoiding public debate." Ahmed Ghappour, a visiting professor at University of California Hastings Law School, has described it as "possibly the broadest expansion of extraterritorial surveillance power since the FBI's inception."

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Categories: Science & Tech News

Games as revolutionary acts: Historians talk 1979 Revolution

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 5:30am

History Respawned's Bob Whitaker talks with historian Zackery Heern about the choice-driven narrative game 1979 Revolution: Black Friday, which is based on real history. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Fable developer Lionhead closes its doors for good

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 5:28am

"We can confirm that after much consideration over the six week consultation period with Lionhead employees, we have reached the decision to close Lionhead Studios." ...

Categories: Gaming News

The Critical Hole At the Heart Of Our Cell Phone Networks

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 5:02am
An anonymous reader writes: Kim Zetter from WIRED writes an intriguing report about a vulnerability at the heart of our cell phone networks. It centers around Signaling System No. 7 (SS7), which refers to a data network -- and the protocols or rules that govern how information gets exchanged over it. Zetter writes, "It was designed in the 1970s to track and connect landline calls across different carrier networks, but is now commonly used to calculate cellular billing and send text messages, in addition to routing mobile and landline calls between carriers and regional switching centers. SS7 is part of the telecommunications backbone but is not the network your voice calls go through; it's a separate administrative network with a different function." According to WIRED, the problem is that SS7 is based on trust -- any request a telecom receives is considered legitimate. In addition to telecoms, government agencies, commercial companies and criminal groups can gain access to the network. Most attacks can be defended with readily available technologies, but more involved attacks take longer to defend against. T-Mobile and ATT have vulnerabilities with fixes that have yet to be implemented for example.

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Revealed: Google AI has access to huge haul of NHS patient data

New Scientist - Breaking news - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 4:36am
A data-sharing agreement obtained by New Scientist shows that Google DeepMind's collaboration with the NHS goes far beyond what it has publicly announced
Categories: Science & Tech News

Weasel halts LHC experiments after chewing on a power cable

New Scientist - Breaking news - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 4:17am
The Large Hadron Collider has suffered a power outage after the unfortunate critter chewed on a 66 kilovolt electrical transformer
Categories: Science & Tech News

DeltaDNA: Whales don't respond to expensive items

GamesIndustry.biz news - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 3:30am
New data shows that, "very expensive individual items or bundles will not make an impact" on monetisation
Categories: Gaming News

Japanese satellite’s death spiral linked to software malfunction

New Scientist - Breaking news - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 2:49am
The Hitomi X-ray space telescope has failed just months after its launch, leaving astronomers hoping to glimpse black holes devastated
Categories: Science & Tech News

Creating the paper-craft art style of Book of Demons

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 2:01am

"We put a lot of effort into making everything the way it looks now and the road to getting here was a really bumpy one. Hope you will enjoy the story of how it all came to life." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Obesity 'Explosion' In Young Rural Chinese A Result Of Socioeconomic Changes, Study Warns

Slashdot Updates - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 2:01am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from BBC: Obesity has rapidly increased in young rural Chinese, a study has warned, because of socioeconomic changes. Researchers found 17% of boys and 9% of girls under the age of 19 were obese in 2014, up from 1% for each in 1985. The 29-year study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, involved nearly 28,000 students in Shandong province. The study said China's rapid socioeconomic and nutritional transition has led to an increase in energy intake and a decrease in physical activity. The data was taken from six government surveys of rural school children in Shandong aged between seven and 18. The percentage of overweight children has also grown from 0.7% to 16.4% for boys and from 1.5% to nearly 14% for girls, the study said. "It is the worst explosion of childhood and adolescent obesity that I have ever seen," Joep Perk from the European Society of Cardiology told AFP news agency.

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China accounted for 31% of Unity game installs in Q1

GamesIndustry.biz news - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 1:31am
The US was a distant second with 11 per cent of Unity's 4.2 billion installs
Categories: Gaming News

FTC strikes a blow against Amazon in IAP lawsuit

GamesIndustry.biz news - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 12:46am
US judge calls out, "millions of dollars billed to Amazon customers without a mechanism for consent"
Categories: Gaming News

Applying lessons from Warcraft's world to Overwatch arenas

Gamasutra - News - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 12:32am

We spoke to Blizzard's Aaron Keller about the design of Overwatch's first-person shooter arenas, and how lessons he learned from designing maps for World of Warcraft still matter today. ...

Categories: Gaming News

In Internet Age, Pirate Radio Arises As Surprising Challenge

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 11:01pm
K7DAN writes: Just as the demise of terrestrial radio has been greatly exaggerated, so has the assumed parallel death of pirate radio. Due to the failure of licensed stations to meet the needs of many niche communities, pirate radio continues to increase in popularity. Helping facilitate this growth is the weakening power of the FCC to stop it, reports the Associated Press. Rogue stations can cover up to several square miles thanks largely in part to cheaper technology. The appeal? "The DJs sound like you and they talk about things that you're interested in," said Jay Blessed, an online DJ who has listened to various unlicensed stations since she moved from Trinidad to Brooklyn more than a decade ago. "You call them up and say, 'I want to hear this song,' and they play it for you," Blessed said. "It's interactive. It's engaging. It's communal." It's upsetting many congressional members who are urging the FCC to do more about the "unprecedented growth of pirate radio operations." They're accusing said pirates of undermining licensed minority stations while ignoring consumer protection laws that guard against indecency and false advertising.

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Smart device pivot could cost Nintendo at home

GamesIndustry.biz news - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 11:00pm
Kimishima embraces smartphones in his NX strategy, but it's a move that'll be tough to sell to the firm's most loyal customers - Japanese families
Categories: Gaming News

All Belgians To Be Given Iodine Pills In Case Of Nuclear Accident

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 7:45pm
mdsolar quotes a report from Phys.Org: Belgium is to provide iodine pills to its entire population of around 11 million people to protect against radioactivity in case of a nuclear accident, the health minister was quoted as saying Thursday. The move comes as Belgium faces growing pressure from neighboring Germany to shutter two ageing nuclear power plants near their border due to concerns over their safety. Iodine pills, which help reduce radiation build-up in the human thyroid gland, had previously only been given to people living within 20 kilometres (14 miles) of the Tihange and Doel nuclear plants. Health Minister Maggie De Block was quoted by La Libre Belgique newspaper as telling parliament that the range had now been expanded to 100 kilometers, effectively covering the whole country. The health ministry did not immediately respond to AFP when asked to comment. The head of Belgium's French-speaking Green party, Jean-Marc Nollet, backed the measures but added that "just because everyone will get these pills doesn't mean there is no longer any nuclear risk," La Libre reported. Belgium's creaking nuclear plants have been causing safety concerns for some time after a series of problems ranging from leaks to cracks and an unsolved sabotage incident. Yesterday, a nuclear plant in Germany was reportedly infected with a computer virus.

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Dissension Grows Inside Anonymous Because Of Political Propaganda

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 6:11pm
An anonymous reader writes from a report on Softpedia: Political tensions relating to the U.S. presidential race are creating turmoil inside the Anonymous hacker collective, muddling waters even more in a group that's known for its lack of leadership and a common goal. The most recent Anonymous infighting relates to the actions of the group's most famous news portal known as AnonHQ, who's been showing downright public support for Bernie Sanders, while being extremely busy at bashing Trump, Cruz, and more recently issuing video threats against Clinton. Ever since Anonymous' official news source has started showing public support for Sanders, many of the group's divisions have publicly disavowed it and have even gone so far as launching constant waves of DDoS attacks at what once used to be the hacker's official news portal. Last month, when a former Anonymous member decided to dox himself, he said in interviews that the group had been infiltrated by government agents.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

Google's OnHub Is First WiFi Router To Support IFTTT

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 5:28pm
An anonymous reader writes: The first router to feature IFTTT support is Google OnHub. IFTTT is an abbreviation of "If This Then That," a free web-based service that can allow users to create "recipes," which are triggered based on changes to other web services such as Gmail, Facebook, Instagram, etc. OnHub's smart features can now connect to the 300-plus programs and apps supported by IFTTT. Google provides some examples in its blog post. For example, you can automatically prioritize Wi-Fi to your Chromecast when it connects to your OnHub network after you plug it in to start binge watching your favorite TV show, or to your Nest Cam when it senses motion or sound after you've exhausted yourself from said binge watching and passed-out on your couch. There's a friendly little video Google put together to explain the feature in detail.

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Who's Downloading Pirated Scientifc Papers? Everyone

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 4:45pm
sciencehabit quotes a report from Science Magazine: In increasing numbers, researchers around the world are turning to Sci-Hub, the controversial website that hosts 50 million pirated papers and counting. Now, with server log data from Alexandra Elbakyan, the neuroscientist who created Sci-Hub in 2011 as a 22-year-old graduate student in Kazakhstan, Science addresses some basic questions: Who are Sci-Hub's users, where are they, and what are they reading? The Sci-Hub data provide the first detailed view of what is becoming the world's de facto open-access research library. Among the revelations that may surprise both fans and foes alike: Sci-Hub users are not limited to the developing world. Some critics of Sci-Hub have complained that many users can access the same papers through their libraries but turn to Sci-Hub instead -- for convenience rather than necessity. The data provide some support for that claim. Over the 6 months leading up to March, Sci-Hub served up 28 million documents, with Iran, China, India, Russia, and the United States the leading requestors.

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VREAL launches first native game streaming platform for VR

GamesIndustry.biz news - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 4:13pm
Beta program available in summer 2016
Categories: Gaming News
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