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New Study Shows Three Abrupt Pulses of CO2 During Last Deglaciation

Slashdot Updates - 2 hours 30 min ago
vinces99 writes A new study shows that the increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contributed to the end of the last ice age more than 10,000 years ago did not occur gradually but rather was characterized by three abrupt pulses. Scientists are not sure what caused these abrupt increases, during which carbon dioxide levels rose about 10 to 15 parts per million – or about 5 percent per episode – during a span of one to two centuries. It likely was a combination of factors, they say, including ocean circulation, changing wind patterns and terrestrial processes. The finding, published Oct. 30 in the journal Nature, casts new light on the mechanisms that take the Earth in and out of ice ages. "We used to think that naturally occurring changes in carbon dioxide took place relatively slowly over the 10,000 years it took to move out of the last ice age," said lead author Shaun Marcott, who did the work as a postdoctoral researcher at Oregon State University and is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "This abrupt, centennial-scale variability of CO2 appears to be a fundamental part of the global carbon cycle." Previous research has hinted at the possibility that spikes in atmospheric carbon dioxide may have accelerated the last deglaciation, but that hypothesis had not been resolved, the researchers say. The key to the new finding is the analysis of an ice core from the West Antarctic that provided the scientists with an unprecedented glimpse into the past."

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Categories: Science & Tech News

Google To Disable Fallback To SSL 3.0 In Chrome 39 and Remove In Chrome 40

Slashdot Updates - 3 hours 15 min ago
An anonymous reader writes Google today announced plans to disable fallback to version 3 of the SSL protocol in Chrome 39, and remove SSL 3.0 completely in Chrome 40. The decision follows the company's disclosure of a serious security vulnerability in SSL 3.0 on October 14, the attack for which it dubbed Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption (POODLE). Following Mozilla's decision on the same day to disable SSL 3.0 by default in Firefox 34, which will be released on November 25, Google has laid out its plans for Chrome. This was expected, given that Google Security Team's Bodo Möller stated at the time: "In the coming months, we hope to remove support for SSL 3.0 completely from our client products."

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Categories: Science & Tech News

Just a level solver: Why my puzzle game took over a year to complete

Gamasutra - News - 3 hours 55 min ago

"I was stumped. Out of optimization ideas, I considered giving up. Maybe I could just put in the best solutions I found on my own and make it a competition for my players to beat those scores?" ...

Categories: Gaming News

Charity Promotes Covert Surveillance App For Suicide Prevention

Slashdot Updates - 3 hours 59 min ago
VoiceOfDoom writes Major UK charity The Samaritans have launched an app titled "Samaritans Radar", in an attempt to help Twitter users identify when their friends are in crisis and in need of support. Unfortunately the privacy implications appear not to have been thought through — installing the app allows it to monitor the Twitter feeds of all of your followers, searching for particular phrases or words which might indicate they are in distress. The app then sends you an email suggesting you contact your follower to offer your help. Opportunities for misuse by online harassers are at the forefront of the concerns that have been raised, in addition; there is strong evidence to suggest that this use of personal information is illegal, being in contravention of UK Data Protection law.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

Kim Kardashian Helps Glu Mobile Rule The World

Game Politics - 4 hours 29 min ago

Love them or hate them, the Kardashians and their brand are a powerful force to be reckoned with. If you need proof simply look at how much money Glu Mobile is making off one mobile game, Kim Kardashian: Hollywood.

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Composing an indie RPG title track

Gamasutra - News - 4 hours 31 min ago

On the collaborative process of working with a composer: "I gave some specific feedback... but I ultimately needed to trust his ability to polish the piece." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Vulnerabilities Found (and Sought) In More Command-Line Tools

Slashdot Updates - 4 hours 44 min ago
itwbennett writes The critical Shellshock vulnerabilities found last month in the Bash Unix shell have motivated security researchers to search for similar flaws in old, but widely used, command-line utilities. Two remote command execution vulnerabilities were patched this week in the popular wget download agent and tnftp client for Unix-like systems [also mentioned here]. This comes after a remote code execution vulnerability was found last week in a library used by strings, objdump, readelf and other command-line tools.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

Pirate Bay Co-Founder Found Guilty of Hacking

Game Politics - 4 hours 49 min ago

Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Warg has been found guilty of hacking into computers and illegally downloading files in Denmark by a Danish court. The Danish court ruled that Warg and his co-defendant are guilty of breaking into computers owned by technology services giant CSC in February 2012. After gaining access to servers, the pair downloaded police and social security files, according to the BBC. Warg could face up to six years in jail when he is sentenced tomorrow.

His accomplice walked away free from the court because he had served 17 months in pre-trial detention.

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Two Finnish studios band together: Next Games acquires Helsinki GameWorks

Gamasutra - News - 4 hours 52 min ago

Two startups with veterans from notable developers like Rovio, Supercell, and Remedy have joined up. Next Games is currently working on a Walking Dead mobile game. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Getting 'Showdown' To 90 FPS In UE4 On Oculus Rift

Slashdot Updates - 5 hours 5 min ago
An anonymous reader writes Oculus has repeatedly tapped Epic Games to whip up demos to show off new iterations of Oculus Rift VR headset hardware. The latest demo, built in UE4, is 'Showdown', an action-packed scene of slow motion explosions, bullets, and debris. The challenge? Oculus asked Epic to make it run at 90 FPS to match the 90 Hz refresh rate of the latest Oculus Rift 'Crescent Bay' prototype. At the Oculus Connect conference, two of the developers from the team that created the demo share the tricks and tools they used to hit that target on a single GPU.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

'DriveClub' for PS Plus Users 'On Hold'

Game Politics - 5 hours 11 min ago

Things are not getting better for Sony when it comes to its online-focused racing game, DriveClub for PS4. Sony's PlayStation Network problems have gotten a bit worse due to the release of the 2.0 update for PlayStation 4, which enabled Share Play and YouTube video uploads. These new connectivity issues have in turn caused even more problems for DriveClub; so much so that Sony has shelved the free PlayStation Plus version of the game. Connectivity issues, which Sony says it is well aware of, have been plaguing the network since the update was released.

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Signed-In Maps Mean More Location Data For Google

Slashdot Updates - 5 hours 26 min ago
mikejuk writes The announcement on the Google Geo Developers blog has the catchy title No map is an island. It points out that while there are now around 2 million active sites that have Google Maps embedded, they store data independently, The new feature, called attributed save, aims to overcome this problem by creating an integrated experience between the apps you use that have map content and Google Maps, and all it requires is that users sign in. So if you use a map in a specific app you will be able to see locations you entered in other apps.This all sounds great and it makes sense to allow users to take all of the locations that have previously been stored in app silos and put them all together into one big map data pool. The only down side is that the pool is owned by Google and some users might not like the idea of letting Google have access to so much personal geo information. It seems you can have convenience or you can have privacy.It might just be that many users prefer their maps to be islands.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

Ubisoft: Nine Million Copies of 'Watch Dogs' Shipped

Game Politics - 5 hours 46 min ago

Ubisoft announced today that it has shipped (or "sold in") more than nine million copies of its hacking-themed action game Watch Dog since it launched. The news was part of the French publisher's latest financial report. Two-thirds of total Watch Dogs sales (to retailers) came from the Xbox One, PS4, and PC versions, according to the company.

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OnLive expands service to Europeans outside the U.K.

Gamasutra - News - 6 hours 1 min ago

If your game is available on OnLive, people in countries other than the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom can now create OnLive accounts and pay to play it. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Pirate Bay Founder Gottfrid Warg Faces Danish Jail Time

Slashdot Updates - 6 hours 8 min ago
Hammeh writes BBC news reports that Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Warg has been found guilty of hacking into computers and illegally downloading files in Denmark. Found guilty of breaching security to access computers owned by technology giant CSC to steal police and social security files, Mr Warg faces a sentence of up to six years behind bars. Mr Warg argued that although the computer used to commit the offence was owned by him, the hacks were carried out by another individual who he declined to name.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

It's DRM Exemption Petition Season At The Copyright Office

Game Politics - 6 hours 19 min ago

It's that time again at the U.S. Copyright Office: every three years the agency in charge of all things copyright-related accepts petitions on activities that should be exempt under the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). 2014 is one of those years, but the deadline is Monday, November 3.

Sherwin Siy, VP of legal affairs at Public Knowledge tells Ars Technica that it's not too difficult to submit a petition, but recommends petitioners keep it under five or six pages long and be specific on what the exemption request will accomplish that serves the greater good.

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Final Fantasy creator's F2P game hits 1M downloads in 3 weeks

Gamasutra - News - 6 hours 21 min ago

Terra Battle, the debut free-to-play mobile game from Final Fantasy creator Hironobu Sakaguchi's Mistwalker studio, has been downloaded more than a million times worldwide in the three weeks since its October 9th launch. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Smoke without fire: What's the truth on e-cigarettes?

New Scientist - Breaking news - 6 hours 31 min ago
They've been called safe, dangerous, a way to quit smoking – and a way to start. New Scientist sifts through the evidence about e-cigarettes (full text available to subscribers)






Categories: Science & Tech News

First Detailed Data Analysis Shows Exactly How Comcast Jammed Netflix

Slashdot Updates - 6 hours 49 min ago
An anonymous reader writes John Oliver calls it "cable company f*ckery" and we've all suspected it happens. Now on Steven Levy's new Backchannel publication on Medium, Susan Crawford delivers decisive proof, expertly dissecting the Comcast-Netflix network congestion controversy. Her source material is a detailed traffic measurement report (.pdf) released this week by Google-backed M-Lab — the first of its kind — showing severe degradation of service at interconnection points between Comcast, Verizon and other monopoly "eyeball networks" and "transit networks" such as Cogent, which was contracted by Netflix to deliver its bits. The report shows that interconnection points give monopoly ISPs all the leverage they need to discriminate against companies like Netflix, which compete with them in video services, simply by refusing to relieve network congestion caused by external traffic requested by their very own ISP customers. And the effects victimize not only companies targeted but ALL incoming traffic from the affected transit network. The report proves the problem is not technical, but rather a result of business decisions. This is not technically a Net neutrality problem, but it creates the very same headaches for consumers, and unfair business advantages for ISPs. In an accompanying article, Crawford makes a compelling case for FCC intervention.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

Sony apologizes for Driveclub's ongoing launch woes

GamesIndustry.biz news - 6 hours 57 min ago
Shuhei Yoshida acknowledges player patience is running out, delays PS Plus edition indefinitely
Categories: Gaming News
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