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EA Cracking Down on 'FIFA 15' Cheaters

Game Politics - 1 hour 40 min ago

In a new open letter to the FIFA community, EA Sports revealed the new actions it will take against those involved in FIFA Ultimate Team scams involving in-game currency in FIFA 15. EA Sports has vowed that it will crack down on those using bots to farm Ultimate Team coins, and those engaged in the buying and selling of those virtual coins on third-party websites.

FIFA Ultimate Team currency can be earned in-game by playing matches and trading players, but you can't buy them and EA does not sell coins to gamers.

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Reinventing the wheel: Why we made our own engine

Gamasutra - News - 3 hours 26 min ago

"After some months of development and close to finishing the game, the engine is very modular, allows to be easily extended, and revisiting an old method does not mean opening Pandora's box thanks to the thorough API design." ...

Categories: Gaming News

A Movie of Triton Made From Voyager 2's Fly-by 25 Years Ago

Slashdot Updates - 3 hours 45 min ago
schwit1 writes: Using restored images taken by Voyager 2 when it flew past Neptune's moon Triton 25 years ago, scientists have produced a new map and flyby movie of the moon. "The new Triton map has a resolution of 1,970 feet (600 meters) per pixel. The colors have been enhanced to bring out contrast but are a close approximation to Triton's natural colors. Voyager's "eyes" saw in colors slightly different from human eyes, and this map was produced using orange, green and blue filter images. ... Although Triton is a moon of a planet and Pluto is a dwarf planet, Triton serves as a preview of sorts for the upcoming Pluto encounter. Although both bodies originated in the outer solar system, Triton was captured by Neptune and has undergone a radically different thermal history than Pluto. Tidal heating has likely melted the interior of Triton, producing the volcanoes, fractures and other geological features that Voyager saw on that bitterly cold, icy surface. Pluto is unlikely to be a copy of Triton, but some of the same types of features may be present." Dr. Paul Schenk provides provides further information on his blog, and the movie can be viewed here.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

Demand for new consoles drives GameStop earnings growth

Gamasutra - News - 3 hours 47 min ago

The company beat analyst expectations to report significant growth in both sales and profits for its most recent financial quarter, including an upswing in its long-falling sales of new software. ...

Categories: Gaming News

PSA: Developers, protect your accounts -- hackers are loose

Gamasutra - News - 4 hours 3 min ago

Last night notable indie developers Zoe Quinn and Phil Fish and his studio Polytron were hacked. Here are some security tips. ...

Categories: Gaming News

DDoS Attacks Disrupt Several Online Games

Game Politics - 4 hours 11 min ago

A series of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks have targeted several popular online games including MMOs RuneScape and Eve Online, according to this Develop report. These attacks have (naturally) caused sporadic outages and limited players' ability to log into these games.

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Blog: Narrative and the MDA framework

Gamasutra - News - 4 hours 26 min ago

"Narrative can drive aesthetics by providing a general set of feelings you want to evoke, but it's a mistake to write a full story at the start." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Students From States With Faster Internet Tend To Have Higher Test Scores

Slashdot Updates - 4 hours 32 min ago
An anonymous reader sends word of correlation found between higher internet speeds and higher test scores. Quoting: The numbers—first crunched by the Internet provider comparison site HSI — show a distinct trend between faster Internet and higher ACT test scores. On the high end, Massachusetts scores big with an average Internet speed of 13.1Mbps, and an average ACT test score of 24.1. Mississippi, on the other hand, has an average speed of just 7.6Mbps and an average score of 18.9. In between those two states, the other 48 fall in a positive correlation that, while not perfect, is quite undeniable. According to HSI's Edwin Ivanauskas, the correlation is stronger than that between household income and test scores, which have long been considered to be firmly connected to each other. The ACT scores were gathered from ACT.org, which has the official rankings and averages for the 2013 test, and the speed ratings were taken from Internet analytics firm Akamai's latest report.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

What's After Big Data?

Slashdot Updates - 5 hours 13 min ago
gthuang88 writes: As the marketing hype around "big data" subsides, a recent wave of startups is solving a new class of data-related problems and showing where the field is headed. Niche analytics companies like RStudio, Vast, and FarmLink are trying to provide insights for specific industries such as finance, real estate, and agriculture. Data-wrangling software from startups like Tamr and Trifacta is targeting enterprises looking to find and prep corporate data. And heavily funded startups such as Actifio and DataGravity are trying to make data-storage systems smarter. Together, these efforts highlight where emerging data technologies might actually be used in the business world.

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Categories: Science & Tech News

GDC Next debuts talks from Halfbrick, LA's Glitch City

Gamasutra - News - 5 hours 26 min ago

GDC organizers debut talks from Halfbrick's Ramine Darabiha (Fruit Ninja) & members of the Glitch City developer collective for the future-focused GDC Next, which will be held in Los Angeles this November. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Researchers Made a Fake Social Network To Infiltrate China's Internet Censors

Slashdot Updates - 6 hours 34 sec ago
Jason Koebler writes: In order to get inside China's notorious internet filter, Harvard researcher Gary King created his own fake social network to gain access to the programs used to censor content, so he could reverse-engineer the system. "From inside China, we created our own social media website, purchased a URL, rented server space, contracted with one of the most popular software platforms in China used to create these sites, submitted, automatically reviewed, posted, and censored our own submissions," King wrote in a study published in Science. "We had complete access to the software; we were even able to get their recommendations on how to conduct censorship on our own site in compliance with government standards."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Star Arcade execs complete management buyout

GamesIndustry.biz news - 6 hours 4 min ago
Klaas Kersting now an investor in multiplayer studio
Categories: Gaming News

Play 'Dishonored' For Free on Steam and Xbox Live

Game Politics - 6 hours 25 min ago

In addition to Arkane Studios' hit game Dishonored being available for free on Xbox Live for Xbox 360 until the end of the month, it is also available for free play on Steam all weekend. Borderlands 2 is also available during the weekend as a free play game.

The first-person stealth action game is playable for free until Sunday at 1pm Pacific Time (4pm Eastern Time). During that same period, you can buy the game for 75 percent off its regular price. The regular version will cost you $5, while the Game of the Year version is $10.19.

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Indie devs facing "mass extinction event" - Prince

GamesIndustry.biz news - 6 hours 34 min ago
Puppy Games co-founder says price erosion will catch up to the industry, suggests a path to survival
Categories: Gaming News

Shortcuts to an infant-like view on the world

New Scientist - Breaking news - 6 hours 36 min ago
Psychoactive stimulants such as caffeine and magic mushrooms may to some extent revert the brain to an infant-like state






Categories: Science & Tech News

33 Months In Prison For Recording a Movie In a Theater

Slashdot Updates - 6 hours 42 min ago
An anonymous reader writes: Philip Danks used a camcorder to record Fast & Furious 6 in a U.K. cinema. Later, he shared it via bittorrent and allegedly sold physical copies. Now, he's been sentenced to 33 months in prison for his actions. "In Court it was claimed that Danks' uploading of Fast 6 resulted in more than 700,000 downloads, costing Universal Pictures and the wider industry millions of pounds in losses." Danks was originally told police weren't going to take any action against him, but he unwisely continued to share the movie files after his initial detainment with authorities.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News

Evolution of MMO maps: Moving bases

Gamasutra - News - 6 hours 56 min ago

"Astro Lords: Oort Cloud allows players to constantly move their bases. This blog outlines the opportunities and challenges it creates for game design, and the consequences it has on processing power and hardware needs." ...

Categories: Gaming News

Botox blitz could work against stomach cancers

New Scientist - Breaking news - 7 hours 21 min ago
When you think of botox, you are more likely to imagine it smoothing skin than fighting cancer, but the toxin could be effective against stomach tumours






Categories: Science & Tech News

Ouya to bring its games to China

GamesIndustry.biz news - 7 hours 23 min ago
China's top smartphone seller Xiaomi has partnered with Ouya, according to a Reuters report
Categories: Gaming News

Tech Looks To Obama To Save Them From 'Just Sort of OK' US Workers

Slashdot Updates - 7 hours 24 min ago
theodp writes Following up on news that the White House met with big biz on immigration earlier this month, Bloomberg sat down with Joe Green, the head of Mark Zuckerberg's Fwd.US PAC, to discuss possible executive actions President Obama might take on high tech immigration (video) in September. "Hey, Joe," asked interviewer Alix Steel. "All we keep hearing about this earnings season though from big tech is how they're actually cutting jobs. If you look at Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, why do the tech companies then need more tech visas?" Green explained why tech may not want to settle for laid-off U.S. talent when the world is its oyster. "The difference between someone who's truly great and just sort of okay is really huge," Green said. "Culture in tech is a very meritocratic culture," he added. "The vast, vast majority of tech engineers that I talked to who are from the United States are very supportive of bringing in people from other countries because they want to work with the very best."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science & Tech News
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